This week's bonkers firm has promoted its legal services by featuring an astronaut hitting a golf ball from the Moon to Earth.

On its website, Parisian-based firm, Fairway, says that "fairness" is key for the firm:
   

Pushing the wordplay a bit more, the firm's website says that Fairway, achieves deals that are "fair":
     
 
And just in case you missed it, Fairway rams it home:
     

A marketing bod at the firm realised that there was more potential to the name, as Fairway can also refer to the main stretch of a golf course. So, naturally, the firm's website features a video of an astronaut hitting a golf ball from the Moon, through space, onto Earth and into Fairway's office, to represent, erm ... a golf "fairway" across the planets. And nothing to do with law. Cue video.

In a galaxy, fair, fair away:
     

A golf ball on the moon is teed up to face Earth: 
     

An astronaut golfer defies physics, logic and Fairway's marketing budget, to hit the ball towards Earth:
     

The ball heads down the galactic fairway. That's one giant shot for mankind:
     

One of the disadvantages of space golf soon becomes apparent, as the ball hurtles towards a satellite in orbit:
     

The ball wipes out the satellite, causing it to burst into flames and giving Houston a problem. But the ball is still on track so, technically, it's a good shot:
     

The flaming ball penetrates the earth's atmosphere and heads towards Paris, as the satellite presumably crashes off screen wiping out an entire community in the suburbs:
     

The ball lands straight down the middle of a chimney. The satellite disaster is forgiven, as it seems the astronaut really managed a peach of a shot:
     

It rolls into an empty meeting room - seems that nobody back on Earth was that bothered:
     

Having made it across the planetary fairway - it's a hole in one as the ball slots into ... a laptop accessory. 
     

The galaxy's most impressive golf shot of all time has enabled a PowerPoint display about Fairway to start on a projector to an empty meeting room. Sport has its anti-climatic moments:
     

Fairway's amazing scenes can be seen here

Or take a stroll down the hall of other bonkerdom websites.
Tip Off ROF

Comments

Roll On Friday 06 Jul 18

*sigh*
Great, thanks, i'm going to spend all morning pondering whether this is actually possible. Given the moon's low gravity, could a decent hit with a suitable driver actually achieve escape velocity? If it did so, then leaving aside orbital periods, manual speed/distance/timing judgments and the difficulties involved in delivering a precise stroke which would bring the ball into Earth's gravity, could this actually be done?
I'm saying yes. Yes, I think this is possible. Obvs, 3Dux is possibly the only human who could achieve it.

Anonymous 06 Jul 18

Thanks to the power of the Google, cut & paste and a trainee who is temporarily out of work because the copier is busted, I can confirm as follows:

"The escape velocity from the surface of the moon is approximately 2380 m/s. In conclusion I think it is obvious to the most casual observer that it is not possible for a human to drive a golf ball at these speeds. No, you cannot hit a golf ball into orbit on the moon."

Anonymous 06 Jul 18

"The escape velocity from the surface of the moon is approximately 2380 m/s. In conclusion I think it is obvious to the most casual observer that it is not possible for a human to drive a golf ball at these speeds. No, you cannot hit a golf ball into orbit on the moon."

Your trainee did not spend enough time on Google. The average velocity of a golf ball (on earth) is 340km/h, which I calculate to be 5,666 m/s.

Anonymous 06 Jul 18

I say "average", that should have been "maximum". And that obviously drops off very quickly.

Anonymous 09 Jul 18

Maybe @15:08 needs an appraisal of his own. Hope he is not near the accounts dept!

340 kmph is approx 94.5mps.
5,666 mps is over 20,000 kmph

Anonymous 10 Jul 18

Anon 10:31 - it may be possible in reduced gravity and with no atmosphere to get a really good swing on the golf club. I believe speeds of up to 150 metres a second would be feasible. Actually, nix that - gravity probably helps to get a better swing by accelerating the downwards motion of the club.

However, the moon's rotation also gives a boost. The moon rotates approximately once every 27 days upon its axis, which equates to 2 x pi / (27 * 24 * 60 * 60) = 0.000002 radians per second. As the moon's radius is 1,737,000 metres, at the moon's equator, this gives a boost of an extra 3 metres a second. The remaining 5,567m/s come from building a tower to both increase this boost, and to reduce the required escape velocity, of height h, where 0.000002h = 5567 - 5,6667/(sqrt(1,737,000) x sqrt(1,737,000/h), or a mere 227,000 kilometres.

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