04 October 2018

A West End firm has fired one of its employees after she called a client a "c***" in a pub fight.

The manager from Pemberton Greenish was drinking with colleagues in a Chelsea pub near the firm's office when she became embroiled in an argument with another group of drinkers. One of Pemberton Greenish's admin staff was punched during the altercation.

When a person in a third, uninvolved, group intervened, the Pemberton Greenish manager called them a c***. Unfortunately the group comprised staff from Cadogan, a property investment company and one of Pemberton Greenish's biggest clients. 

Bar fight
A few quiet drinks with Pemberton Greenish, yesterday 

 

Simon Slater, CEO of Pemberton Greenish, told RollOnFriday "we deeply regret that this incident occurred. We have apologised unreservedly both to Cadogan and the individual employee." He said the firm took immediate action when the incident came to its attention and a disciplinary process was conducted, "following which the manager is no longer at the firm". 

PG has a fondness for the C word. Prior to her conviction for stalking, when the (now ex) head of residential real estate discovered her husband was having an affair, she phoned up the mistress and repeatedly shouted "c**t" down the line.

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Comments

Anonymous 05 Oct 18

I have some sympathy for her and hope that the firm are giving their ex-employee some support, even although she has now left.

PerfidiousPorpoise 05 Oct 18

Don't think the firm should have gotten involved. It's a matter between two private citizens in their capacity as such and the incident did not take place at a work-related function.

Anonymous 05 Oct 18

PerfidiousPorpoise, it is right that the firm got involved because it concerned one of their biggest clients!

PerfidiousPorpoise 05 Oct 18

I can understand why the firm felt they needed to do this, but wish it weren't the case. Interesting to know how the person on the client side knew that the other person was at PG and how it got reported back, etc. To me it smacks to some extent of the rich kid losing a fight and having his daddy fire the other guy's dad.

Anonymous 05 Oct 18

So what's real the story here?  It is that the CEO makes absolutely no mention of an employee who might have been badly hurt. He seems more concerned with the client than a member of the firm.  Anyone who visits a  pub in Chelsea (yes even Chelsea) might be subjected to hearing very bad language but no doubt the client's employees are themselves blameless and always behave impeccably.  Did the incident occur during  working hours and was it work related? Doesn't sound like it,  And final paragraph is old news.    

Anonymous 05 Oct 18

Remember years ago, a senior partner, riding his bicycle was tooted from behind by the driver of a motor vehicle. The partner turned and gave the V sign and some colourful language. The driver of the vehicle was the CEO of a major client of the firm. They both saw the funny side of that and nothing further transpired. 

Anonymous 05 Oct 18

Problem for small firms is they can't risk losing their biggest clients. It would ruin them financially. They have to be seen to be backing the client if they want to retain their business. Bad luck for the employee.

Dilly Barlow 05 Oct 18

PP ‘To me it smacks to some extent of the rich kid losing a fight and having his daddy fire the other guy's dad.’   I gather that’s PG all over. 

Monty 09 Oct 18

Prurient retards. Why didnt they tell the client not to tell tales and what goes on in the pub, stays in the pub? That’s what a magic circle firm would have done. The smaller the firm, the lower the class of the operators. Maybe if PG had more decent and strong client relationships they’d have had the confidence not to get involved. Add one name to the long list of law firms you wouldnt work for to save your life.

A. Non 10 Oct 18

I am an extremely busy and important partner at a law firm much better than Pemberton Greenish. If a client complained to me that a staff member had called them a c***, my first question would be: “were you being a c***?”. If they answered “yes” (which a significant proportion of my clients would have to, if being honest) I’d say “well you deserved it, then” and let the matter rest. if they answered “no”, I’d assume they were liars, and let the matter rest.

Anonymous 11 Oct 18

Would love to know what the client did to deserve being called a c***. I assume they didn't pull the punch...

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