How often do you think about the Roman Empire

GenZ kids want to know.

Per Toutatis, an excellent question.

I have recently started watching, for the first time, I, Claudius. First broadcast in 1976.

Stellar cast of some fine British actors.

It's been a while since I've  read Robert Graves's I Clauduis, Claudius The God and his translation of Suetonius's The Twelve Caesars.

I forgot which pop historian observed (or invited us to think upon) what it would have been like for a Roman stationed in Roman Britain--imagine you grew up in the Mediterranean climate, all olives and wine and whatnot, and then you are sent to this miserable outpost at the edge of the world where it is constantly grey and cold and rainy. Londinium would be bad enough, but imagine you are posted to a garrison at Hadrian's wall.

Ever since then, I think of the Roman Empire whenever I see the drab grey skies of Britain.

My daughter asked me this the other weekend as a test.  I asked if she was including the Eastern Roman/Byzantine empire until its fall which made her laugh.

Anyway as I'm in the process of writing/playtesting my ancient wargames rules, the answer is every couple of days. 

I forgot which pop historian observed (or invited us to think upon) what it would have been like for a Roman stationed in Roman Britain--imagine you grew up in the Mediterranean climate, all olives and wine and whatnot, and then you are sent to this miserable outpost at the edge of the world where it is constantly grey and cold and rainy.

And of course the reverse situation could (and did) occur - Romans who were here for yonks putting down roots.  The Roman Centurion’s Song – The Kipling Society 

 

I've always loved this bit, the more so because over the last six or seven years, as I've gotten much more into birding, I've been outdoors much more and seen the weather in all its moods.  It can be crap a fair amount of times, but a good amount of the time (at least in the South East) it's not, and having the odd day blotted out makes you appreciate fine weather that much more.  

What purple Southern pomp can match our changeful Northern skies,

Black with December snows unshed or pearled with August haze -

The clanging arch of steel-grey March, or June's long-lighted days?