Childhood things that no longer exist

My parents always had a box in the car boot with a roll of plastic film that could be used as an emergency windscreen.  Guess it was a throw back to the days before laminated glass when a bit of stone could shatter the whole windscreen.

spending five times the usual amount on a two-day old english newspaper to read about the cricket while on holiday...

Having to use only paper charts for navigation was definitely before my time - in fact none of the vessels I worked on even had paper charts onboard, but that was due to ease of navigation in those areas.  British waters or at least the Channel are much more tricky to navigate if you're not familiar with the area than most of the forrin places I've been - lots of boat traffic and buoys etc. 

Have the brands in your sport changed much over the years (both boats and kit)?  Penn used to be the great name in big game fishing reels (now Shimano) but a lot of old Bertram and Hatteras hulls are still around, and still highly regarded.  

Lots of types of boats have come and gone.  I remember ten years ago there would be 50 J109 boats at Cowes Week with their own class and last year there were a handful of them mixed in with other classes.  The kit makers have been pretty consistent although North Sails has rather taken over the world when it comes to race sails.

What would the working life of a boat in your sport be and what happens to eg. all the J109s you spoke of?  A good sportfishing hull (classic Bertram etc) can go on almost indefinitely with repowerings etc. European boats are not as solidly built but I know at least one Jeanneau that has been worked pretty hard for over 10 years and was fished keenly recreationally for probably at least 10 years before that.  Sorry if this is drifting away from the original thread.  

They’re still out there and some have been sold overseas and some are now just cruised rather than raced.  It’s like racing cars that get older and are no longer competitive but end up being bought by collectors and people who race them in classic competitions.  There are whole events for the old wooden boat enthusiasts these days.

Orwell as others have mentioned there were also duplicators 

I know Sails.  They were also called carbon copies.  I was correcting the suggestion that they weren't the same thing - carbon copy referred to a wide range of copy processes before the photocopier was commercialised. 

Music centres (not the 80's midi vertical ones, the ones where the top loading tape deck sat alongside the record deck)

Chicken in a basket

Mid morning historical TV programs in one of the three channels comprising panning in and out of still pictures of castles.

Oliver Postgate's voice on Ivor the Engine

Dad having a large whiskey before setting off on a long car journey

Rushing in from outside just to watch the Christmas adverts on ITV, then heading out again when the program was actually on

 

Guy reminds me of when we were on summer hols during the 2001 Lions tour to Oz. No internet of course, and no mobile signal where we were.

After a couple of hours scouring round the local towns trying to find out the score in the 3rd and decisive Test, forced to drive back to the local airport to buy a day old Sunday Times, wrapped up in plastic,  at vast expense.

Of course we lost -  Justin ‘The Plank’ Harrison stealing a crucial line-out.

 

The little number stickers you could put on the radio dial to show where the stations were. 
 

Ronco products and adverts. 
 

The videoprinter. Nothing worse than seeing OPPONENT 1 and then the thing sticking. 
 

Regional tv idents. ATV “IN COLOUR”. Anglia’s knight on horseback. Yorkshire’s chevron which took off for the 3-2-1 intro. 
 

Crown Court on ITV when ill/skiving/school hols were not quite so coordinated. 
 

Children’s comics. From the Beezer up to the Victor. 
 

Atari consoles. And their poor relations, the LED handheld games that were Lidlesque ripoffs of Japanese trademarks. Like Puck Monster or Munchman or Space Attackers. 

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