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strutter
Posted - 02 January 2018 19:13
Hepple
Mr Hargreaves
Posted - 02 January 2018 19:38
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Cotswold

Also aldi
Merkz
Posted - 02 January 2018 19:42
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Tarquins
Caorunn
The Botanist

and for true gin oneupmanship Monkey 47


aviator
Posted - 02 January 2018 20:07
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Tarquins navy strength
Fishers
Martin Millers
Zan00
Posted - 02 January 2018 20:13
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This is great. I've ordered some Hepple it sounds nice
.....Meh
Posted - 02 January 2018 21:02
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I quite like standard Hendricks but perhaps I am a pleb.

Ophir is nice with a red chilli snapped into it.
aviator
Posted - 02 January 2018 21:12
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"nice"?
Rhamnousia
Posted - 02 January 2018 21:12
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Clementine and cinnamon tonic!!
aviator
Posted - 02 January 2018 21:15
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No Clergs, that is just wrong.
Zan00
Posted - 02 January 2018 21:34
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clementine and cinnamon tonic? Juice a clementine and stir with a cinnamon stick? Surely this is only necessary to cover up bad Gin (like liverpool gin...ugh)
Pinkus
Posted - 02 January 2018 22:17
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209.
GHF
Posted - 02 January 2018 23:05
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Xoriguer
Wellington
Posted - 02 January 2018 23:12
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Mombasa Club.

Thank me later.
InfiniteMonkeyTheorem
Posted - 03 January 2018 00:06
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Slake
trainerboy
Posted - 03 January 2018 03:37
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Enjoyed Whitakers Pink Peculiar this Christmas - Hibiscus, Cardamom and Pink Peppercorn notes supposedly, although it was more of the the floral, less of the pepper. As a rule, I love a spicy/cardamom gin.

That said, did a blind G&T test last year with a few mates - was v interesting that there was a total gender split in preferences on the reveal - ladies preferred the modern styles: Martin Miller, Bombay etc, while the posturing gents (inc me) were all gutted to discover their tastes extended no further than Gordons and Beefeater. Tanqueray was where everyone met in the middle.

homesickanvil
Posted - 03 January 2018 06:31
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Sacred
Cat on a hot tin ceiling
Posted - 03 January 2018 07:35
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Bombay Sapphire or Millers for a G&T. Tanqueray for a Martini.
Scylla
Posted - 03 January 2018 09:23
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Obadiah Hakeswill
Posted - 03 January 2018 09:39
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I second Sacred. It shouldn't be the best given it is from a micro-distillery in Highgate (*shudders*) that also makes vodka and whisky. But it is.
stop: wangertime!
Posted - 03 January 2018 10:10
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Not a gin afficionado tbf but I quite like the one we had in for xmas - 13
Patience Groove
Posted - 03 January 2018 10:12
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all these gin varieties that have appeared from nowhere is a triumph of marketing over substance - a gin and tonic is, give or take, a gin and tonic, just as it has always been. The tonic is actually more important than the gin.
244 sleeps till Christmas
Posted - 03 January 2018 10:12
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Patience Groove
Posted - 03 January 2018 10:13
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the same thing happened with vodka 15 years ago - after a few years everyone realised it was all basically the same and more about the mixers and the fad died out.
244 sleeps till Christmas
Posted - 03 January 2018 10:22
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Vodka is rank.
volenti_nfi
Posted - 03 January 2018 10:29
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Not Too Fussy
Posted - 03 January 2018 14:06
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further nods for ophir (nice with a strawberry) and caorunn (red apple)
camenbert
Posted - 03 January 2018 15:52
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Seems that most people aren't terribly adventurous with gin, but here's a few

Two Birds Old Tom - it's not a dry Gin (so not a "London" or a "Plymouth"), but an 18thC sweeter gin
Amalfi - lemon gin
Brockmans for a purple-fruit-flavoured gin
Pinkster is nice.
Adnams (the brewers) make a nice one.
I'm always partial to a Bombay Sapphire, but it's a bit citrusy
Bulldog is good smooth neutral gin
Boyles Irish milk gin was quite fun (a slight milky taste to it)
Hendricks for making a cucumber martini
Conker Gin is quite strongly flavoured.
Pin gin (from Louth Lincs) is interesting, but a bit too peppery for my tastes
there was an Edinburgh gin I had on hollibobs, can't remember the precise name, but it was quite junipery

The Edinburgh Gin Rhubarb and ginger liqueur is not a pure gin, but it's good fun (and very nice in sparking wine)
Zero Gravitas
Posted - 03 January 2018 15:56
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See I really don't get this. People vvank on about gin, which basically tastes like gin, and whatever tonic and garnish you use, but start talking about craft ale and all the knockers come out the woodwork. It's not even as if craft gin isn't even more hipster tvvattish than the craft ale scene (which I acknowledge is in large part full of hipster tvvats).
camenbert
Posted - 03 January 2018 15:58
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then you clearly haven't tried enough gin. hint: it's not obligatory to drink it with tonic.

my dislike of "craft ale" is that there is b*gger all craft in it, but a one-note "how can I make this beer so hoppy it makes my beard curl" bastardisation of real ale.
Discworld_Librarian
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:06
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Agree that too much hops in beer is fully over for me.


I third the Sacred gin, I bought some for Mrs D and it's a strong favourite. Goes very well with the Fever Tree "Mediterranean" tonic.

Prefer brown spirits for drinking and mixing myself.
camenbert
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:07
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what, like turps?
Zero Gravitas
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:08
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hint: it's not obligatory to drink massively hopped IPA when choosing your "craft" beer (although it is of course preferable). Plenty of decent pale ales, (whisper it) lagers, wits and stouts and porters to choose from.
camenbert
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:09
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most of which are not "craft" beers, but real ale.
I know there are plenty of decent bitters to drink, none of which are craft ales.
Zero Gravitas
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:13
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I think that word does not mean what you think it means (to the extent either term is actually possible to precisely define).

Also, I would be interested to know how many of the posters on this thread drink gin with anything other than tonic or a cocktail
Discworld_Librarian
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:15
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Very true ZG, and I don't tar all craft beer because of the preposterous overhoppiness of some.

I do think bum-puckeringly hoppy ales that turn one's tongue into perfumed toilet paper dominate the category in sheer number terms much more than they should, and I get the feeling it rather crowds out what could be wider selections of those other ales you describe.

I also think gin is spirits for people who don't really like spirits..
Discworld_Librarian
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:18
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I never drink gin neat - I've seen Monkey 47 being served just over ice and it was fine but was still probably better with a splash of tonic.

I often drink rum, rye or bourbon neat, and scotch always neat save for a drop of cold water.
camenbert
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:21
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Given than most attributes of a self-identified "craft beer" are simply those of a "real ale", the only distinguishing feature (on this side of the pond - American is slightly different) is it's trendiness. Which is generally expressed by making it hoppy and giving it pseudo-industrial labels.

Let's see your definition then.

and as for "gin is for people who don't like spirits" that is simply cobblers.
EasternGrit
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:24
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another vote for Opihr. I found Bloom a bit bland. I like Warner Edwards rhubarb one too - serve with a slice of ginger
pancake humper
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:26
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That's silly cam, plenty of the UK craft brewers are producing interesting and varied styles that absolutely none of the traditional real ale brewers were.

Though tbf many of the real ale brewers have begun producing more varied beers in response.
Patience Groove
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:29
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"then you clearly haven't tried enough gin. hint: it's not obligatory to drink it with tonic."

Neat Gin is Hogarth territory ffs,
Patience Groove
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:30
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also think gin is spirits for people who don't really like spirits..

I disagree, I do think however that vodka is for people who either like alcohol too much or dont like it much at all.
Montagueh
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:31
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Craft ale in the UK is defined as "any tom, dick or harry with dodgy facial hair who walked into a pub in Kent once and ordered a pint of Spitfire and though "oh, this is rank hoppy shoite and no mistake, I think I'll make even ranker, hoppier shoite in a micro-brewery and rip off pseuds who pretend to like it to look cool with their mates""...
camenbert
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:36
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"That's silly cam, plenty of the UK craft brewers are producing interesting and varied styles that absolutely none of the traditional real ale brewers were."

Don't agree at all - lots of interesting beers have been produced by small brewers for many years - they just haven't been marketed quite as aggressively. What new styles of beer have they produced?

"Neat Gin is Hogarth territory ffs," whereas neat whisky is what exactly?
.....Meh
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:42
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I'm feeling like we should have a Rof drinks at the Oliver Cromwell....
.....Meh
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:43
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And by Cromwell I do of course mean conquest. Soz.
Zero Gravitas
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:46
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Craft is more about a) being brewed by someone other than the major breweries and b) using techniques that aren't necessarily CAMRA approved (i.e. served out of a cask at 14 degrees C). It was led by hoppy IPAs, and has been unashamedly marketed, but if you actually look at what the decent sized "craft" brewers like Magic Rock and Beavertown are brewing there is tonnes of stuff that is not Citra and Centenial hopped IPAs.

Re gin, are you (cam, or anyone for that matter) saying that you drink it neat?
Discworld_Librarian
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:48
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"I also think gin is spirits for people who don't really like spirits.. "

Well OK, I am being glib in order to be contro.

But a LOT of people like gin who don't like any other spirits. It's the only spirit category that (practically) nobody ever drinks neat, and you have to have a really, really high-end one to realistically enjoy it neat.

It's the only spirit adaptable enough and cheap enough for there to suddenly be *millions and millions* of "craft" brands in otherwise un-special pubs and bars that are now calling themselves "GIN BARS", who at the same time have done exactly nothing to boost their other back-bar spirits.

Coincidence? I think not.

Sure, you can be a gin aficionado and appreciate it for what it is, but you aren't ever learning anything about provenance, the base spirit, or aging because none of those matter for gin - most gin producers don't even distil their own base spirit as there's no need, and it's expensive.

Patience Groove
Posted - 03 January 2018 16:53
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"Neat Gin is Hogarth territory ffs," whereas neat whisky is what exactly?

The difference is that decent whiskys are enjoyable neat (at least to lots of people) and designed to be drunk that way. Nobody drinks neat gin, since the gin alley days.
Zero Gravitas
Posted - 03 January 2018 17:10
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camenbert
Posted - 03 January 2018 17:48
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So the only ways to drink gin are neat or with tonic?... right...

heh at that company - mind you, I would dob them in, I can't stand that sort of name-wankery - there was a pub that called itself "the Pub". tosspots.

Ftoad I like beer, I like chewy dark beers of the sort that are terribly unfashionable now. I like independent beers, I like traditional beers, I like beer variety. What p1sses me off about stuff in the UK that calls itself "craft beer" is that it isn't new, it's not some great breakthrough, it's just the latest iteration of real ale, but that's not trendy enough for them, (I'm looking at you Brewdog), so they have to pretend they invented it. It's like when the Premier league started and tried to pretend that football hadn't happened before that point.

the fact I don't like the beer they make is almost lucky, as I can't stand their pissweaselling denial of their roots. so feck 'em and their hipster clothing and studied faux-edwardiana

Zero Gravitas
Posted - 03 January 2018 18:13
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Marble have been brewing for 20 years, "pint" is a lovely pale ale not unlike Wainwright, but better. They are a small real ale brewery, and I suspect you would like most of their output.

And "craft" isn't "Real Ale" which has been claimed by Camra as being a very specific type of beer served in a certain way. What craft has done is stick two fingers up to the rules of what is "real" or not, and brewdog, for all their sins (and they are generally not very popular in the "craft" movement) have helped lead the charge.

Re gin, what I'm getting at is that people poke fun at craft beer vvankery when, no matter what you think of the stuff, you can clearly tell the difference between one and another, but will happily tede on about craft gin when 99% of people drinking it do so with tonic and trendy garnishes and half a glass of ice which affect the taste far more than the gin that is the base of it.

You've been quite coy about how take your gin? Are you a martini man?
Zero Gravitas
Posted - 03 January 2018 18:14
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TLDR - Craft is a rejection of the CAMRA's real ale definition, and of large breweries making kittens beer. It isn't really much more than that which is why I find it so weird so many people get so worked up about it.

TLDR 2 - how do you drink gin if not with tonic or in a cocktail?
The Goose
Posted - 03 January 2018 18:45
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Cam has gin on his cornflakes.
Spodric
Posted - 03 January 2018 18:51
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Cam needs to read my other thread
Zan00
Posted - 03 January 2018 19:43
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Gin and tonic appeals to me b/c its a low calorie drink whereas cocktails are often laced with sugar and overpowering. I like to try the different subtle flavours with gin. Its not boring, there's always a new one to try
camenbert
Posted - 04 January 2018 10:11
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in a cocktail is fine - there was someone above saying that gin only tasted of the tonic it was with

Where do you get that from re craft beer v real ale - don't forget there wouldn't be small breweries etc without Camra stoking the interest. As for "crap beer" - that is very much a matter of taste - I prefer most Camra beers to craft beers.

the whole large brewery thing is a red herring too - lots of craft brewers being bought out by big brewers

TDLR - Craft beer is emperor's new clothes
NickyNockyNineDoors
Posted - 04 January 2018 10:14
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I drink (virtually) neat gin, and so do millions of others. It's called a dry martini.
Patience Groove
Posted - 04 January 2018 10:16
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"So the only ways to drink gin are neat or with tonic?... right..."

No, but once you add it to a mixer the mixer will impact the flavour far more than the base of gin - whether it is tonic or something else.

I learnt long ago with G&T though that it was better to invest in top quality tonic and have a bog standard gin.
camenbert
Posted - 04 January 2018 10:18
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try a four way test with Brockmans, Tanqueray and two tonics. Then come back,
Queenie E
Posted - 04 January 2018 10:24
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Tanqueray X
Monkey 47
Rambla 41 (mate gave me a bottle from a Naked Wines crate, it's really lovely)
Bombay

I will pretty much drink any gin apart from Hendricks tbf

all the fancy Fevertree tonics really fvck me off though - I like a nice slimline Schweppes and bars only seem to have Fevertree

the next big thing will be rum apparently https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/dec/29/why-2018-will-be-a-rum-year-p ossibly
Chambers
Posted - 04 January 2018 10:29
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Gin is a current fad, as someone said up there. Its all basically the same stuff with different fancy labels.

Craft ale similar. I had one the other day and the landlord said it had the essence of raspberries. Pardon?

Just give me a Carlsberg.
Patience Groove
Posted - 04 January 2018 10:31
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" drink (virtually) neat gin, and so do millions of others. It's called a dry martini. "

adding bitters changes the taste completely - certainly more than different brands of gin do.
NickyNockyNineDoors
Posted - 04 January 2018 11:22
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"adding bitters changes the taste completely - certainly more than different brands of gin do."

I suppose, but i don't put bitters in my martini. basically just coat the ice cubes in the shaker with dry vermouth and the rest is straight gin (so like a 20:1 ratio or more). Not unusual for a modern dry martini i'd say. And then the type of gin that you use obviously make a huge difference.
Zero Gravitas
Posted - 04 January 2018 11:27
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OK so we've found one person on the thread who might be able to tell the difference between different gins in their usual drink.

Any more for any more?
camenbert
Posted - 04 January 2018 11:30
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well, it's not clear if you mean me or him, but I can taste the difference in my g&t. Not had a martini for a bit, or a gin and dubonnet.
Discworld_Librarian
Posted - 04 January 2018 14:46
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NickyNockyNineDoors
Posted - 04 January 2018 11:22
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"adding bitters changes the taste completely - certainly more than different brands of gin do."

I suppose, but i don't put bitters in my martini. basically just coat the ice cubes in the shaker with dry vermouth and the rest is straight gin (so like a 20:1 ratio or more). Not unusual for a modern dry martini i'd say. And then the type of gin that you use obviously make a huge difference.



That's a pretty macho way to take a Martini, I must say, and not one that most people in the cocktail world would endorse.

Is your vermouth off? Don't you like the taste of it? Why not just can it altogether, or get one you like?
Discworld_Librarian
Posted - 04 January 2018 14:53
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A dry Martini should (places didactic ROF hat on head) just mean you're making it with dry vermouth. 4:1 or 2:3/4s is generally considered a good balance, as it's balance you're seeking (or maybe you aren't).

It's not a competition to see who can contrive the most comically minimal method to eke a minute drop of vermouth into the drink.

A lot of that mythos apparently comes from Churchill, who had a couple of quite funny ways to approach it - and also that back before it was common to understand how to store it, most vermouth on most back-bars went off after it was opened (this will take 2 weeks if not refrigerated), and was disgusting.
NickyNockyNineDoors
Posted - 04 January 2018 16:54
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I wouldn't call it "macho", it's just a matter of taste. I like vermouth just fine, but prefer only a hint of it with certain gins. I made martinis with a really low vermouth ratio (typically i pour in a half jigger of dry vermouth, to coat the ice, stir, then pour out all but a small amount of liquid - so not exactly sure the ratio of the vermouth that remains) using Star of Bombay and a twist. The people who had it (including two girls who were not traditional martini drinkers) were surprised at how much they liked it and how drinkable it was. Very crisp with nice floral botanicals. If i'm making a martini with, say, Plymouth, i'd use a bit more vermouth and olives, as i think that suits the gin better.

Anyway, my conclusion: gin (mostly) neat is good and different gins taste very different.